Italian Verbs Learning

Italian Simple Past 101 – Learn This Italian Verb Tense by Singing a Beautiful Song
Italian Simple Past 101 – Learn This Italian Verb Tense by Singing a Beautiful Song

Italian Simple Past 101 – Learn This Italian Verb Tense by Singing a Beautiful Song

Learn Italian simple past, listening to Mina singing “La canzone di Marinella” (Marinella’s song), written by the singer song-writer Fabrizio De Andrè: La canzone di Marinella (Marinella’s Song) Questa di Marinella è la storia vera This is the true story of Marinella, che scivolò; nel fiume…

Negative Expressions in Italian 101 – Learn Italian By Heart Through Songs & With Fun (Proven Method)

Listening to Italian love songs you can learn now some common negative expressions in Italian. Here’s Laura Pausini singing “Non c’è”. Sing along to learn what’s probably the most used negative phrase in Italy: Tu non rispondi più al telefono You don’t…

Italian Verb VORREI: Learn by Heart This Very Common Verb Form with 2 Catchy Songs & 1 Insightful Video Lesson – Go Learn Italian!

The Italian verb Vorrei is very common in spoken Italian and corresponds to the English verb “I would like”. It’s the first person of the present conditional of “volere” that means “to want”. The alternative way to express a desire in…

Italian Preterite Tense VS. Imperfetto – 2 Tricky Forms… Don’t Let This New Lesson Slip Through You Fingers!

The Italian preterite tense is sometimes a difficult subject for English speakers when they learn the Italian language. They often confuse the preterite with the imperfect and vice versa.

How to Use the Italian Reflexive Verbs – Easy and Short Lesson (with 1 Video)…

This Italian Grammar lesson covers the Italian Reflexive Verbs and the Italian Reflexive Pronouns. In the Italian language, a verb is considered reflexive if the subject (the performer of the action) and the object (the receiver of the action) are the same. 

Common Italian Verbs: “Essere” &”Stare” – Easily Learn 2 Ways of Saying “To Be” in Italian

Here are some videos that clearly explain the differences between these 2 very common Italian verbs. Their  meaning is (in general): Essere = to be – Stare = to stay/to be